Fearless After 50
Transform the Warrior In You
WELCOME!
Message from Sue

The inspiration for this program came recently when I turned 50.  I discovered that life was now very different on and off the mat.

 

Yoga is a worldwide phenomenon encompassing all ages, but in the West it is often culturally represented by Youth and youthfulness.  Fearless After 50 wants to celebrate the midlife Warrior.  We want to encourage you to practice whether you are 50 or older to discover how to live the best life possible.

 

During the 30 days I will share with you some of the things that I found useful in improving my own wellbeing.  It will include the Philosophy of Yoga and Ayurveda Medicine, which is an ancient philosophy of the knowledge of life.  If you practice Yoga regularly and follow some of the very simple principles that I will share with you it will change your life in many wonderful ways.

 

Every one of us has a story.  Although we cannot go back and rewrite the beginning, it’s up to us to write our ending.

 

If we accept the changes in our body and work with the fear in our heart then aging can be a time to explore our expansive and resilient spirit.

 

I look forward to guiding you over the next 30 days to find your Midlife Warrior!

“Wisdom Warriors don’t just DO YOGA we LIVE YOGA”
-Sue Deakin
COMMITMENT

I will transform and revolutionize my life by fully committing to the 30 Day Transformation program as described in this Welcome booklet by fully committing to and trusting this community. By joining the 30-Day Program, I commit to fully participating in and completing the program as outlined below. In this commitment, I offer my intention and support to my transformation and to each and every participant’s transformation as follows.

DAILY YOGA PRACTICE

I commit to building a daily yoga practice and maintaining an accurate log of all practices. Six (6) days per week is ideal. Practice may include taking classes that have been designed and as per program given for home.

DAILY MEDITATION

I commit to developing a daily meditation and maintaining an accurate log.

BALANCING DIET

I commit to maintaining a diet log for the duration of the program- making effort to follow the guidelines provided as per your workshop.                                                                                                       

JOURNALING

I commit to maintain a journal of experiences, feelings and practices. I commit to using the excavating for each week as a guide for journaling and to using my journal reflecting as insight to share with the group on our celebration day if you wish to share.  

JOURNALING

I commit to the weekly readings and practice suggestions outlined in the program.

EMPOWERMENT

I commit to empowering myself. I commit to empowering this program.

Knowing Your Body Types from an Ayurvedic Point of View
Ayurvedic Body Constitution

Ayurveda views each and every person as unique, with a unique mind-body constitution and a unique set of life circumstances, all of which must be considered in determining either natural healing approaches or recommendations for daily living.  This view is in alignment with the modern science which views individuals as unique in the universe with a unique DNA.

According to Ayurveda, because we each have a unique constitution, our health prescription must be unique to us.  This means that in order to be healthy, you need to eat certain foods that are beneficial for your body type and stay away from others.  Your exercise program must be personally suitable as well.  Your constitution determines very much about you – your body, your personality, even how you relate to other people.  Understanding it lets you know what you need in order to be healthy.
 

Image by Katherine Hanlon
Knowing Your Body Types from an Ayurvedic Point of View
Dietary Recommendations for Vata Dosha

If you need to balance Vata, a fat-free diet is not for you.  Cook foods with a little ghee (clarified butter) or include some olive oil in your diet every day.  Olive oil cannot be heated to high temperatures without destroying its healing value, so drizzle olive oil over fresh soft flatbreads, cooked grains, or warm vegetable dishes.  Ghee can be heated to high temperatures without affecting its nourishing, healing qualities, so use ghee to sauté vegetables, spices or other foods.

 

Cooked foods, served hot or warm, are ideal for balancing Vata.  Pureed soups, hot cereal, rice pudding and hot nourishing beverages such as nut milks or warm milk are excellent “comfort” foods and help pacify aggravated Vata.  Minimise raw foods such as salads and raw sprouts.

 

The three ayurvedic tastes that help balance Vata are sweet, sour and salty, so include more of these tastes in your daily diet.  Milk, citrus fruits, dried fruit or sunflower or pumpkin seeds make good snack choices.  Eat less of the bitter pungent and astringent tastes.

 

Nuts are wonderful Vata-pacifiers.  Soak ten almonds overnight.  Blanch and eat in the early morning for a healthy burst of energy.  Walnuts, hazelnuts and cashews make good Vata-pacifying snacks.

 

Carrots, asparagus, tender leafy greens, beets, sweet potatoes and summer squash such as zucchini and lauki squash are the best vegetable choices.  They become more digestible when chopped and cooked with Vata-pacifying spices.  Vegetables can be combined with grains or with mung beans for satisfying one-dish meals.  Avoid nightshades and larger beans.

 

Brown Basmati rice is ideal for balancing Vata.  Cook it with a little rock salt and ghee for added flavor.  Wheat is also good – fresh flatbreads made with whole wheat flour (called atta or chapatti flour and available at Indian grocery stores) and drizzled with a little melted ghee combined well with cooked vegetables or Vata-balancing chutneys.

 

Most spices are warming and enhance digestion, so cook with a combination of spices that appeals to your taste buds and is appropriate for the dish you are making.  Ayurvedic spices such as small quantities of turmeric, cumin, coriander, dried ginger, black pepper and saffron are very good for vata people.

 

Drinks lots of warm water through the day.

Suggested Food Choices for Vata dosha

Grains:  Rice, wheat, quinoa, oats, amaranth, all cooked until tender

 

Vegetables:  Asparagus, tender greens, carrots, peas, green beans, white daikon, zucchini, lauki squash, parsnips, sweet potatoes, all cooked

 

Fruits:  Avocado, pineapple, papaya, peaches, plums, grapes, mangoes, oranges, cherries, all kinds of berries, limes and lemons, apples if stewed, coconut, fresh figs, raisins (soaked)

 

Lentils:  Mung beans, urad dhal, mung dhal, masoor dhal, toor dhal, red lentils, all cooked until butter-soft

 

Dairy:  Whole milk, cream, butter, fresh yogurt (cooked into foods), lassi, cottage cheese, fresh paneer cheese

 

Oils:  Ghee, olive oil, sesame oil, cold-pressed nut oils such as walnut

 

Herbs:  Fresh ginger root, cilantro, curry leaves, parsley, fresh basil, fresh fennel, mint

 

Nuts and Seeds:  Almonds (soaked and blanched), cashews, walnuts (soaked), pistachios, hazelnuts, pecans (soaked), pine nuts, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds

 

Spices:  Ajwain, dried ginger, asafetida (hing) in small quantities, fenugreek, turmeric, cumin, clove, cardamom, coriander, fennel, black pepper, basil, Chinese cinnamon, nutmeg, mustard seed, mint, rosemary, thyme, lemon and orange zest, oregano, rock salt or sea salt, black salt, dried mango powder, pomegranate seeds or powder

 

Other:  Rice milk, soy milk, poppy seeds, sucanat, turbinado sugar, raw honey, and tofu in moderation (diced small and cooked with spices)

Dietary recommendations for Pitta Person

If you need to balance Pitta, choose ghee, in moderate quantities, as your cooking medium.  Cow’s ghee according to the ancient ayurvedic texts, is cooling for both mind and body.  Ghee can be heated to high temperatures without affecting its nourishing, healing qualities, so use ghee to sauté vegetables, spices or other foods.  Olive oil could be used by that person who does not like ghee.

 

Cooling foods are wonderful for balancing Pitta dosha.  Sweet juicy fruits, especially pears, can cool a fiery Pitta quickly.  Milk, coconut and coconut juice, and smoothies made with ripe mangoes and almonds or dates are examples of soothing Pitta-pacifying foods.

 

The three ayurvedic tastes that help balance Pitta are sweet, bitter and astringent, so include more of these tastes in your daily diet.  Milk, fully ripe sweet fruits, and soaked and blanched almonds make good snack choices.  Eat less of the salty, pungent and sour tastes.

 

Carrots, asparagus, bitter leafy greens, fennel, cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussel sprouts, green beans and bitter gourd (in very small quantities) are good vegetable choices.  They become more digestible when chopped and cooked with Pitta-pacifying spices.  Vegetables can be combined with grains or mung beans for satisfying one-dish meals.  Avoid nightshades.

 

Basmati rice is excellent for balancing Pitta.  Wheat is also good – fresh flatbreads made with whole-wheat flour (called atta or chapatti flour and available at Indian grocery stores) combine well with cooked vegetables or Pitta-balancing chutneys.  Oats and amaranth are other Pitta-balancing grains.

 

Choose spices that are not too heating or pungent.  Ayurvedic spices such as small quantities of turmeric, cumin, coriander, cinnamon, cardamom and fennel offer flavor, aroma and healing wisdom.

 

Drinks like fresh buttermilk with lunch will help enhance digestion and cool, not ice-cold, water to quench thirst.

Suggested Food Choices for Pitta Dosha

Grains:  Rice, wheat, barley, oats, amaranth, sago, all cooked until tender

 

Vegetables:  Asparagus, tender and bitter greens, bitter gourd, carrots, fennel, peas, green beans, zucchini, lauki squash, artichoke, parsnips, okra, celery, Brussel sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, beets, sweet potatoes, all cooked, small quantities of raw lettuce, carrots or cucumber

 

Fruits:  Avocado, pineapple, peaches, plums, grapes, mangoes, melons, pears, pomegranates, cherries, all kinds of berries, apples, coconut, dates, fresh and dried figs, raisins (soaked), all ripe and sweet

 

Lentils:  Mung beans, mung dhal, red or brown lentils, small portions of chickpeas, lima beans, black beans, all cooked until butter-soft

 

Dairy:  Whole milk, cream, butter, fresh yogurt (cooked into foods), lassi, cottage cheese, fresh paneer cheese

 

Oils:  Ghee, olive oil

 

Herbs:  Cilantro, curry leaves, parsley, fresh basil, fresh fennel, mint

 

Nuts and Seeds:  Almonds (soaked and blanched), sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds

 

Spices:  Turmeric, cumin, cardamom, coriander, fennel, small quantities of black pepper, Chinese cinnamon, mint, saffron, sweet orange zest

 

Other:  Rice milk, soy milk, date sugar and tofu in moderation (diced small and cooked with spices)

Dietary Recommendations for Kapha Person

If you need to balance Kapha, use mustard oil, in very small quantities, as your cooking medium.  Steaming foods and then adding a mixture of spices sautéed in very little mustard oil is best.  In general, avoid too many oily foods.

 

Light, warming foods help to balance Kapha.  Clear vegetable soups with beans and diced vegetables, stews made with Kapha-balancing vegetables, bean casseroles, dhal soups and light grain/vegetable combinations are ideal for balancing Kapha, especially when combined with Kapha balancing spices.  Stay away from too much salt and instead infuse dishes with fresh herbs and spices for flavor.

 

The three ayurvedic tastes that help balance Kapha are pungent, bitter and astringent, so include more of these tastes in your daily diet.  Apples, chickpeas cooked with Kapha-balancing spices or steamed broccoli or cauliflower with a light olive oil and spice mixture make healthy Kapha-pacifying snacks.  Eat less of the salty, sweet and sour tastes.

 

Carrots, asparagus, okra, bitter leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and bitter gourd are good vegetable choices.  They become more digestible when chopped and cooked with Kapha-pacifying spices.  Vegetables can be combined with lighter grains or mung beans for satisfying one-dish meals.  Fresh green chili peppers and fresh ginger root add flavor while balancing Kapha.

 

Choose lighter whole grains, and eat grains in moderation.  Barley, buckwheat, millet and couscous are good choices.  If you choose heavier grains, such as rice or wheat, eat very small quantities.

 

Zesty warming spices are wonderful for balancing Kapha.  Ayurvedic spices such as turmeric, cumin, coriander, cayenne, black pepper, dried ginger, asafetida (hing), cloves and fenugreek offer flavor, aroma and healing wisdom.

 

Drink buttermilk infused with digestion-enhancing spices and herbs with lunch and lots of warm water through the day to help flush toxins from the body

Suggested Food Choices for Kapha dosha

Grains:  Buckwheat, quinoa, barley, millet, oats, amaranth, sago, small portions of Basmati rice, all cooked until tender

 

Vegetables:  Asparagus, all kinds of greens, bitter gourd, green beans, lauki squash, artichoke, celery, Brussel sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, beets, kohlrabi, daikon, radish, all cooked

 

Fruits:  Apricots, prunes, peaches, pears, cherries, berries, apples, lemons, limes, pomegranates, dried figs, raisins

 

Lentils:  Mung beans, mung dhal, toor dhal, red or brown lentils, small portions of garbanzos, lima beans, black beans, all cooked until butter-soft

 

Dairy:  Milk with less fat in it, lassi, small portions of cottage cheese or fresh paneer cheese

 

Oils:  Small portions of mustard, ghee and olive oil

 

Herbs:  Cilantro, curry leaves, parsley, fresh basil, fresh mint, fresh oregano, fresh thyme, sage, neem leaves

 

Nuts and Seeds:  Sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds

 

Spices:  Turmeric, cumin, cardamom, coriander, fennel, dried ginger, Chinese cinnamon, black pepper, mint, saffron, dill, lime zest, nutmeg, cayenne, fenugreek, mustard seed, oregano, marjoram, thyme, rosemary, paprika, cloves

 

Other:  Raw honey in moderation, unsalted unbuttered popcorn, cooked tofu in small quantities (diced small and cooked with spices)

Healthy Diet
Six Tastes According to Ayurveda and Their Benefits

Much of the wisdom of Ayurvedic nutrition rests on the tip of your tongue, literally!  According to Ayurveda, the sense of taste is a natural guide map towards proper nutrition.  For ages, humans relied largely upon taste to discover healthy foods in nature and avoid toxicity.  Our taste buds do much more than simply identify tastes; they unlock the nutritional value of foods and provide the initial spark to the entire digestive process.

 

Food speaks to us directly through taste.  A juicy pear may call out to us with a gentle message of delight, while the flaming chili pepper cries out in warning.  As we tune into the tastes naturally desired by the body, we tap into the body’s innate wisdom regarding food and nutrition.  Ayurveda identifies six tastes by which all food can be categorized:  Sweet (madhur), Sour (sour), Salty (lavan), Bitter (tikta), Pungent (kattu), and Astrigent (Kashaya).  While the first four tastes are probably recognizable, the last two may not seem familiar.  Pungent taste is hot and spicy as found in a chili pepper, while Astringent taste is dry and light as found in popcorn.

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